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What Superintendents and Administrators Can Do

1. WHO ARE THE KIDS?
• Have consistent processes in place that identify military-connected students (those with parents/guardians who are serving in the Active Duty, National Guard, Reserves, or are Post-9/11 Veterans).
• Consider adding this as a question on your enrollment forms: “Do you have a parent/guardian who is a member of the Active Duty, National Guard, Reserves, or a Post-9/11 Veteran?”
• Use this information to build awareness, inform faculty, focus support, and identify practices worthy of attention.
• Encourage campus recognition and appreciation for both military students and their parents.
• Don’t forget the siblings! Encourage school administrators to ask about brothers and sisters who are serving.
• Stay informed about what schools are doing, especially during challenging times.

2. WHAT OTHER CONNECTIONS DO WE HAVE?
• Ask faculty and staff annually, to share if they are currently serving or have a family member who is currently full-time or in the Reserve Components (Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force or Coast Guard).
• Identify Veterans in schools, administration, support staff and on your school board.
• Build a local speakers bureau.
• Tap into local, state and national resources (such as the Library of Congress’ Veterans’ History Project).
• Find out what resources are available to support children and youth through the military, in the community, and through national organizations.

3. ARE WE LISTENING, LEARNING AND RESPONDING?
• Have processes or procedures in place at the district and campus levels to periodically check-in with military-connected parents, students and staff.
• Consider assuring representation from military-connected students and parents on advisory groups and site committees (i.e. calendar development committee).
• Review policies and practices--are they sensitive and flexible for all students who may experience school transitions?
• Evaluate programs, practices and initiatives. Know and make available What’s Working and Why.

4. ARE WE INFORMING THROUGH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT?
• Assure that serving the military-connected student is part of the priorities for professional development.
• Provide special program staff, guidance professionals and registrars additional training on solutions and options to assist students with both entry and exit transitions.
• Focus attention on the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children (www.mic3.net)--assure policies and practices are in synch with the Compact tenants and that parents are consistently informed.
• Use connections to the local/area military community to access speakers and resources.
• Tap into the Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC) professional development offerings and Speakers Bureau.

5. ARE WE USING THE POWER OF PARTNERSHIPS EFFECTIVELY?
• At the high school and middle school levels-- learn about and add the MCEC Student to Student and Junior Student to Student (S2S and JS2S) programs.
• Provide forums and regular opportunities to invite local/area military leaders to meet, exchange insights and collaborate with you (Active Duty, National Guard and Reserve).
• Include a military leader as an ex officio member of the school board.
• Assure that the district and campus leadership attend local/area military-related events.
• Encourage the district public affairs staff to coordinate and communicate with their military counterparts.
• Encourage and showcase adopt-a-school and adopt-a-unit initiatives.
• Apply to the MCEC for their Partnership of Excellence Award.
• Annually review district and campus websites--are they useful and relevant for any family moving in or leaving?